The Millet Magic

Kutki / Shavan (Hindi) Samai (Tamil) Chama (Malayalam) Samai (Telugu) Samai (Kannada) Gajro / Kuri (Gujarati) Kangni (Bengali) Suan (Oria)

The Little Millet is the less popular member of the millet family; it grows well and abundantly in any kind of soil. Grown throughout in India, this millet is suitable for all age groups. In South India, it often replaces the rice in the idli batter, or is stirred together as a congee, and sometime, just boiled and tossed as a salad.

 High in iron

 Good source of antioxidants

 Boosts immunity

 Acts as a neutraceutical

 Improves heart health

Nutritive Value of Samai

  • 100gms per serving
  • Carbohydrates 73 g
  • Dietary Fibre 8 g
  • Sugar 1 g
  • Fat 4 g
  • Saturated 0 g
  • Ployunsaturated 0 g
  • Monosaturated 0 g
  • Trans 0 g
  • Protien 10 g
  • Sodium 5 mg
  • Pottasium 195 mg
  • Cholesterol 0 mg
  • Vitamin A 0 %
  • Vitamin C 0 %
  • Calcium 1 %
  • Iron 17%
  • Protein 5–8%
  • Minerals 2.5 %
  • Calcium 344mg%
  • Potassium 408mg%
  • Fat .3%
  • Calories 336

The Millet Magic

In the Sangam period (6th century BCE to c. 3rd century CE), inhabitant of pastoral tracts, often referred to as mullai region’ grew a variety of millets, including the little millet.